If you leave a comment and set a password, and I approve your comment, you will be able to post new comments in the future without moderation if you use the same username and password combination. If you do not enter a password, a random password will be assigned, and your next comment will have to wait for approval as well.

Comments are not accepted for entries more than 2 months old.


Back to Post
Text:
(8000 character limit. Get your own blog if you've got that much to say. Seriously.)
Username:
(50 characters or less)
Password:
(50 characters or less)
 

Original Post:

David Brooks of the New York Times has a decent commentary on the happenings in Taxachusetts:

In times of crisis, Americans rally around their government, but most of the time they have treated it as a supporting actor in national life. Americans are an unusual people, with less deference to central authority and an unparalleled faith in themselves. They seem to want a government that is helpful but not imperious, strong but subordinate.

Over the years, American voters have reacted against any party that threatens that basic sense of proportion. They have reacted against a liberalism that sought an enlarged and corrosive government and a conservatism that threatened to dismantle the government’s supportive role.


He fawns over Obama a tad much for my liking, but in general I think his read of the situation is a good one. Of course, I'm not in favor of a government that is "helpful", "strong", or "energetic", but then I'm not, politically speaking, an average American. If I were, Ron Paul would be president right now.